FAQs

Please take a moment to read our most commonly asked questions. We're always available to answer your questions and encourage you to contact our office if you have a question that is not answered below.

Q: What is a Pediatrician?

A: A pediatrician is a medical doctor who specializes in the care of children. Pediatricians have undergone special training in the health and illnesses of infants, teens and young adults, and the majority of pediatricians are certified by the American Board of Pediatrics after passing a comprehensive exam.

Pediatricians provide preventive health care for children in good health and medical care for children who are acutely or chronically ill. They also provide parents with support and advice with issues such as growth and development, safety and prevention, nutrition, and emotional wellness to foster a lifetime of good health.

Q: Can I meet my pediatrician before my baby is born?

A: Yes, in fact we strongly encourage parents-to-be to visit our office for a prenatal appointment. This is a great way to get acquainted with our office and our doctors. During this visit, we will answer any questions that you have about our practice or your new child. Visit our expectant parent's page for more information.

Q: How often should my child see the pediatrician?

A: Your child should not only see the pediatrician for an illness. It is also important to schedule well-child-care exams regularly, beginning in infancy. Also called well-care visits or checkups, these routine examinations provide the best opportunity for the doctor to observe the progress of your child's physical and mental growth and development; to counsel and teach parents; to detect problems through screening tests; to provide immunizations, and to get to know one another. Well-care visits are strongly recommended as part of preventive pediatric care.

Well-child visits are also a good time for parents to raise questions and concerns about a child's development, behavior, nutrition, safety and overall well-being.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends this schedule for routine well-care visits:

  • 3 to 5 days
  • 1 month
  • 2 months
  • 4 months
  • 6 months
  • 9 months
  • 12 months
  • 15 months
  • 18 months
  • 24 months
  • 30 months
  • 3 years
  • 4 years
  • And once every year thereafter for an annual health supervision visit that includes a physical exam as well as a developmental, behavioral, and learning assessment.

Q: What is the best way to schedule an appointment with your office?

A: You can schedule an appointment by calling our office during regular business hours, or by requesting an appointment online.

Q: Is your office accepting new patients?

A: Yes, we always welcome new patients. Contact our office for additional information or request an appointment.

Q: Why does my child need to receive vaccinations?

A: Immunizations are a series of shots given to children at different ages to help ward off serious, and potentially fatal, childhood diseases. Making sure your child receives immunizations when scheduled is the best way to help protect your child from potentially fatal diseases. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, vaccinations have reduced the number of infections from vaccine-preventable diseases by more than 90%. If you're apprehensive about vaccinations, please do not hesitate to contact our office.

Q: What is a Nurse Practitioner?

A: Nurse Practitioners (NPs) provide much of the same care provided by physicians and maintain collaborative working relationship with a Supervising Physician. NPs are licensed by the state in which they practice, and have a board certification. Nurse Practitioners are able to specialize in an area of study they desire (i.e. Pediatrics, Family Practice, Adult, Geriatric, etc.,) and provide care within the scope of their expertise. Our Nurse Practitioners are certified by National Certification Board of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners and Nurses.

Q: What can a Nurse Practitioner do?

A: Nurse practitioners may treat both acute and chronic conditions, as well as prescribe medications and therapies for the patient at hand. The core philosophy of the field is individualized care. Nurse practitioners focus on patients' conditions as well as the effects of illness on the lives of the patients and their families. NPs make prevention, wellness and patient education priorities. Our Nurse Practitioners will return your child to their Primary Care Physician at New Beginnings Pediatrics for follow up appointments to maintain continuity of care.

Q: What sort of Education, licensure, or board certifications do Nurse Practitioners have?

A: To be licensed as a nurse practitioner, the candidate must first complete the education and training necessary to be a registered nurse (RN). Requirements for a registered nurse include an associate degree in nursing (ADN), a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing (BSN), or completion of a diploma program, as well as direct patient care for acutely or chronically ill patients. In Ohio a master's degree is required. To become NPs, nurses with an ADN or diploma must enter a bachelor of science to master's program.

Once registered nurse status is attained, the candidate must complete a state-approved advanced nursing education program that usually specializes in a field such as family practice, pediatrics, acute care or women's health. A university, which grants a master's of science in nursing (MSN) degree which is now the minimum degree required

After completing the education program, the candidate must be licensed by the state in which he or she plans to practice. The State Boards of Nursing regulate nurse practitioners and each state has its own licensing and certification criteria. In general, the criteria include completion of a master's degree in nursing and certification by an accrediting body (CPNP, AANP). The license period varies by state; some require biennial relicensing, others require triennial.

Before or after receiving state licensing, a nurse practitioner can apply for national certification from one of several professional nursing organizations such as the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) or the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners(AANP). Contrary to popular belief, the American Nurses Association (ANA) does not offer certification, but is linked with the ANCC.

Q: What is a Physician Assistant?

A: A physician assistant (or PA) is a nationally certified and state-licensed medical professional. PAs practice medicine on healthcare teams with physicians and other providers.They practice and prescribe medication in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and all U.S. territories, with the exception of Puerto Rico.

Q: What can a Physician Assistant do?

A: A physician assistant can:

  • Take your medical history
  • Conduct physical exams
  • Diagnose and treat illnesses
  • Order and interpret tests
  • Develop treatment plans
  • Counsel on preventive care
  • Assist in surgery
  • Write prescriptions
  • Make rounds in hospitals and nursing homes

PAs’ specific duties depend on:

  • The setting in which they work
  • Their level of experience
  • Their specialty
  • State laws

Q: How are PAs educated and trained?

A: Most programs are approximately 26 months (3 academic years) and require the same prerequisite courses as medical schools. Most programs also require students to have about three years of healthcare training and experience. Students take courses in basic sciences, behavioral sciences and clinical medicine across subjects such as anatomy, pharmacology, microbiology, physiology and more.
They then complete a total of more than 2,000 hours of clinical rotations in:

  • Family medicine
  • Internal medicine
  • Obstetrics and gynecology
  • Pediatrics
  • General surgery
  • Emergency medicine
  • Psychiatry

Q: How are PAs certified and licensed?

A: Before they can practice, PAs who graduate from an accredited program must:

  • Pass the Physician Assistant National Certifying Exam (PANCE) administered by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants
  • Get licensed by the state they wish to practice in

In order to maintain certification, PAs must:

  • Complete a recertification exam every 10 years
  • Complete 100 hours of continuing medical education (CME) every 2 years

The “PA-C” after a PA’s name means they are currently certified.

  • National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (administers PANCE)
  • State licensing requirements
  • More information on maintaining certification
  • Learning Central - more than 450 CME activities